Library Researcher Series: Literature Reviews (Part A & B)

Recommended Reading

This article nicely outlines the different types of literature reviews:

Grant & Booth (2009). A typology of reviews: an analysis of 14 review types and associated methodologies Health Information and Libraries Journal, 26, pp.91–108.

Andrew Booth's book is a thorough, but readable book outlining the steps of a comprehensive literature review:

Booth, A., Papaioannou, D., & Sutton, A. (2012). Systematic approaches to a successful literature review. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Writing up the Literature Review

Examples of Literature Reviews

Stand Alone Literature Review

Niederhauser, A., VanDeusen Lukas, C., Parker, V., Ayello, E. A., Zulkowski, K., & Berlowitz, D. (2012). Comprehensive programs for preventing pressure ulcers: A review of the literature. Advances in Skin & Wound Care, 25(4), 167-88; quiz 189-90. 

As Context for a New Research Study

Sutton, J., & Smith, P. (1999). Bullying as a group process: An adaptation of the participant role approach. Aggressive Behavior, 25 (2), 97-111.

Session Descriptions: Why and How to do a Comprehensive Literature Review

Why and How to Do a Comprehensive Literature Review – Part A
To view the recorded presentation please go here: 
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This session will describe the reasons for doing a comprehensive literature review, and will focus on designing a search strategy for keyword databases such as Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar.  We will briefly cover saving your search, and writing up your literature review.

  • What is a literature review
  • Why do one
  • Main steps of a review
  • Sample searches
  • Saving your search
  • Writing your literature review

Why and How to Do a Comprehensive Literature Review – Part B

This session will describe the reasons for doing a comprehensive literature review, and will focus on designing a search strategy for databases with subject headings such as Medline, ERIC, and PsycINFO.  We will briefly cover saving your search, and writing up your literature review.

  • Overview of the points from Part A
  • Subject headings and how to use them
  • Sample searches
  • Saving your search
  • Writing your literature review

Formulating a Question

Breaking up your question into these 4 elements (which you can easily remember with the mnmeonic device PICO) will make your literature search process easier:

P:  Patient, population, &/or problem
  • Description of the patient, population and/or the target disorder of interest
  • What are the most important characteristics of the patient?
  • How would you describe a group of patients similar to yours?
  • What is the disorder and condition of interest?
I:  Intervention
  • Which intervention, prognostic factor, diagnostic tool, or exposure are you considering?

C:  Comparison intervention

  • What alternative do you want to compare with the intervention?
  • Examples: standard of care, reference standard, Placebo

O:  Outcome

  • What outcome you hope to accomplish or measure?

 

Other models you may wish to use for question formulation include:

Wildridge, V., & Bell, L. (2002). How CLIP became ECLIPSE: a mnemonic to assist in searching for health policy/management information. Health Information & Libraries Journal, 19(2), 113-115.

Schlosser, R. W., Koul, R., & Costello, J. (2007). Asking well-built questions for evidence-based practice in augmentative and alternative communication. Journal of Communication Disorders, 40(3), 225-238.

Booth, A. (2006). Clear and present questions: formulating questions for evidence based practice. Library hi tech, 24(3), 355-368.

From Question to Keyword...

Handouts and Forms